Dharma Lion

Chinese_lion_amkMany Dharma Lions and Lionesses leaving this world recently, it seems.  I was sorry to hear of the death of Stephen Levine on January 17th.  Years ago, when I’d drifted away from practice for a time, I was able to go to a weekend teaching on death and dying presented by Stephen and his wife Ondrea.  To my surprise it was pure Dharma, so that I almost felt guilty that it was being paid for by my employer.  But it was powerful, and returned me to the path.

And some years later when I first struggled with depression, I took much from their teaching about facing pain, softening into grief, and keeping love primary.  It helped me to formulate a way to work with that pain.

I listened to this final teaching from Stephen and Ondrea’s website the other day after reading of his death, and found again the power of their wisdom, compassion, and their great gift to all of us.   Deep bows and gratitude to them both….

 

Vow

Early in this practice period, I’m struck by the strangeness of vow.  How it can be clear in my heart that I want to do it, while at the same time resistance rises and is heavy in my chest.  I vow to write and yet feel that there is nothing to say.  Vow is intention but more.  A promise.  It is clear that I want to follow through.  To live in vow.

I remember the men’s group I was part of so many years ago.  None of us could handle commitment very well.  Finally one day, one man said he’d realized that a vow isn’t something you speak once and you’re done.  He said he’d come to see you have to repeat that vow daily, in every moment really.  Somehow that made it easier.  Like alcoholics who say they don’t have to stop drinking forever, just for one moment, one day.  And that is how they can do it for 50 years.  It’s easier in one way to conceive of in that way.  But though it is easier, it’s a bait and switch, because it actually makes it harder.  But in that group all those years ago, it made it easier for all of us.  He was married shortly after his realization, and the other 4 of were also married within the year.  All of us.

One utters vow, and everything changes.  it can feel like a cage, like a cell.  At the same time vow saves me, keeps me on the path, holds me accountable. 

And sometimes vow is silent, unknown, something silent I don’t even realize.  Jung said that people with addictions were looking for god or spirit in the bottle or the drug, and had to see what they were truly looking for.  Or as David Foster Wallace put it so well, you’re going to worship something or someone, so you might as well be aware who you’re choosing to worship.  And good old Bob Dylan comes to mind here too, with his “You’re going to have to serve somebody.”  So it occurs to me that we all serve make some vow, observe it.  I would like to be clear to myself what it is.  At times in my life it has been to get by with as little work, suffering, conflict or pain as possible.  Or to get as much money or sex or praise as possible.  Or to run from fear.  I have lived in those vows.  So I might as well choose what vow I will live in.

And this vow, this one I’m working on during this practice period, to get a daily writing practice going again.  Instead I hem and haw, avoid writing, or sit and my mind goes blank.  I come out of the tub overflowing with ideas and thoughts to put down, and simply don’t.  So perhaps I need to make this vow more visible, more public, like the public proclamation that was one meaning of a koan.  And sometimes the craziest ideas, the craziest vows are the best ones.  So I vow here and now to write daily, it may be one sentence or one haiku, or a long rant like this.  But I will write and post it, put it out in the world.  That may be just enough to overcome my inertia.  To put myself in a position of having to follow through.  Years ago when i was first starting out with zazen practice, I signed up to be a doan, one who opens the zendo, keeps time and leads the chanting.  Because it was a way to trick myself, to be sure I’d be there at least on that day to sit regardless.  I trick myself or rationalize things all the time to NOT have to do them.  Why not do it now as a way to do them.  And it takes fear, pride, avoidance, laziness–everything else out of the equation.  Just make the vow and do it.  Emotion is removed.  Or at least neutralized.  Vow is purified activity.

 

Reckless words

I am going to try speaking some reckless words, and I want you to try to listen recklessly.   Chuang Tzu

We’re in the fourth week of a 100-day practice period at Vine of Obstacles, the online support for practice created by my teacher Dosho Port (check here for more information.)  Each of us participating has set forth our intention and commitments to sitting zazen, to focus on one precept or similar work, to Dharma study and to “walking our talk” in engagement with the world.

One focus of my commitment was to work on a daily writing practice, informed by an accompanying focus on the precept of “not speaking falsehood” and right speech.  I’ve been feeling like I’m following through on all my commitments with the exception of starting up that regular writing practice again.  I kept finding a lot of difficulty in getting traction with that.

In thinking about the why and the what of my intention, a suggestion for how suddenly became clearer to me.  A voice (as a friend of mine often puts it, “the same one that told Noah it would be a good idea to build an ark”) said, “Posting these writings would help to keep you honest about it.”  Which sounded at first like a terrible idea to me.  But then it began to make some sense.

So…I will go ahead with that daily writing practice, and post the results here regularly.  It is not something I like doing, since I prefer to do lots of polishing to my writing, even what I put on here.   So I apologize in advance to anyone who finds this boring or raw or unpolished.  I can only ask that you read these words recklessly.   And hope there are a few words whose recklessness turn out to be an advantage.